Accredited Investors

The federal securities laws define the term “accredited investor” in Rule 501 of Regulation D as:

1. a natural person who has individual net worth, or joint net worth with the person’s spouse, that exceeds $1 million at the time of the purchase, excluding the value of the primary residence of such person;
2. a natural person with income exceeding $200,000 in each of the two most recent years or joint income with a spouse exceeding $300,000 for those years and a reasonable expectation of the same income level in the current year; or
3. a bank, insurance company, registered investment company, business development company, or small business investment company;
4. an employee benefit plan, within the meaning of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, if a bank, insurance company, or registered investment adviser makes the investment decisions, or if the plan has total assets in excess of $5 million;
5. a charitable organization, corporation, or partnership with assets exceeding $5 million;
6. a director, executive officer, or general partner of the company selling the securities;
7. a business in which all the equity owners are accredited investors;
8. a trust with assets in excess of $5 million, not formed to acquire the securities offered, whose purchases a sophisticated person makes

Alternative investment Products

Alternative investment products, including real estate investments, notes & debentures, hedge funds and private equity, involve a high degree of risk, often engage in leveraging and other speculative investment practices that may increase the risk of investment loss, can be highly illiquid, are not required to provide periodic pricing or valuation information to investors, may involve complex tax structures and delays in distributing important tax information, are not subject to the same regulatory requirements as mutual funds, often charge high fees which may offset any trading profits, and in many cases the underlying investments are not transparent and are known only to the investment manager. Alternative investment performance can be volatile. An investor could lose all or a substantial amount of his or her investment. Often, alternative investment fund and account managers have total trading authority over their funds or accounts; the use of a single advisor applying generally similar trading programs could mean lack of diversification and, consequently, higher risk. There is often no secondary market for an investor’s interest in alternative investments, and none is expected to develop. There may be restrictions on transferring interests in any alternative investment. Alternative investment products often execute a substantial portion of their trades on non-U.S. exchanges. Investing in foreign markets may entail risks that differ from those associated with investments in U.S. markets. Additionally, alternative investments often entail commodity trading, which involves substantial risk of loss. Investments offered through LightPath Capital, Inc., are not bank guaranteed and may lose value.

Variable Annuities

Variable rate annuities have many benefits and certain risks. They are long term investments which often have account maintenance fees and management costs. They may be subject to surrender charges and a 10% penalty for withdrawals prior to age 59 1/2 (much like IRAs).

No Offer or Solicitation

The contents of this site constitute neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy any security which can only be made by prospectus. Investing in real estate and 1031 exchange replacement properties may not be suitable for all investors and may involve significant risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, loss of principal, lack of liquidity, limited transferability, conflicts of interest and real estate fluctuations based upon a number of factors, which may include changes in interest rates, laws, operating expenses, insurance costs and tenant turnover. Investors should also understand all fees associated with a particular investment and how those fees could affect the overall performance of the investment. Neither Archer Investment Advisors, Leslie Pappas, nor LightPath Capital, Inc. provide tax or legal advice, as such advice can only be provided by a qualified tax or legal professional, who all investors should consult prior to making any investment decision.